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WFLD was founded by a joint venture of the parties that each competed individually for the license and construction permit to operate on UHF channel 32.Field Enterprises—owned by heirs of the Marshall Field's department store chain, and publishers of the Chicago Sun-Times and the Chicago Daily News—was the station's majority partner (with a 50% interest) and was responsible for managing WFLD's day-to-day operations; they were led by veteran broadcasting executive Sterling C. Channel 32 was christened the "Station of Tomorrow" by an April 1966 Sun-Times article because of its innovative technical developments in broadcasting its signal.

I suddenly wanted to know, what would it be like to not drink?

Chicago writer and comedian Andy Boyle discusses his life without alcohol over the past two years.

The deal ultimately fell through nearly one year later in February 1970; WFLD was noteworthy for being the longtime home of the local B-movie program Svengoolie.

There were two versions of the showcase: the original incarnation of the series began on the station on September 18, 1970, under the title Screaming Yellow Theatre, with local disc jockey Jerry G.

It also broadcast news programming from the Sun-Times/Daily News newsroom.